Complete The Chart With The Comparatives And Superlatives

Complete The Chart With The Comparatives And Superlatives

Complete The Chart With The Comparatives And Superlatives – Understanding comparatives and superlatives is essential for effective communication in English. These grammatical structures are used to compare the differences or similarities between two or more things, as well as to highlight the highest or lowest degree of a quality. In this article, we’ll explore how comparatives and superlatives are formed and provide examples to illustrate their usage in context.

Comparatives

Comparatives are used to compare two things, indicating that one thing has more or less of a quality than the other. In general, comparatives are formed by adding ‘-er’ to short adjectives (e.g., ‘bigger,’ ‘faster’) or by using ‘more’ before longer adjectives (e.g., ‘more beautiful,’ ‘more interesting’). Here’s a breakdown of how comparatives are formed:

| Adjective | Comparative | Example |
|——————–|——————–|———————–|
| Short (1-2 syllables) | -er | tall → taller |
| | | fast → faster |
| | | big → bigger |
| Long (3+ syllables) | more | beautiful → more beautiful |
| | | interesting → more interesting |
| | | intelligent → more intelligent |

Examples:

  1. The blue car is faster than the red car.
  2. She is taller than her younger sister.
  3. This book is more interesting than the one I read last week.
  4. The new smartphone is more expensive than the older model.

Superlatives:

Superlatives are used to compare three or more things, indicating that one thing has the highest or lowest degree of a quality among the group. Superlatives are formed by adding ‘-est’ to short adjectives (e.g., ‘tallest,’ ‘fastest’) or by using ‘most’ before longer adjectives (e.g., ‘most beautiful,’ ‘most interesting’). Here’s how superlatives are formed:

| Adjective | Superlative | Example |
|——————–|——————–|———————–|
| Short (1-2 syllables) | -est | tall → tallest |
| | | fast → fastest |
| | | big → biggest |
| Long (3+ syllables) | most | beautiful → most beautiful |
| | | interesting → most interesting |
| | | intelligent → most intelligent |

Examples:

  1. Mount Everest is the tallest mountain in the world.
  2. She is the fastest runner on the track team.
  3. This is the most beautiful sunset I’ve ever seen.
  4. The Nile River is the longest river in Africa.

Irregular Forms:

Some adjectives have irregular comparative and superlative forms that do not follow the standard rules. Here are some examples of irregular forms:

| Adjective | Comparative | Superlative |
|——————–|——————–|———————–|
| good | better | best |
| bad | worse | worst |
| far | farther/further | farthest/furthest |

Examples:

  1. She sings better than anyone else in the choir.
  2. This is the worst movie I’ve ever seen.
  3. Paris is farther from London than Brussels.

Mastering comparatives and superlatives is essential for expressing comparisons and degrees of qualities in English. By understanding how these grammatical structures are formed and using them correctly in context, you can enhance your writing and speaking skills and communicate more effectively in English. Practice using comparatives and superlatives in sentences to become more comfortable with their usage and gain confidence in expressing comparisons and degrees of qualities accurately and fluently.